The building was then bought by the Full-Fashioned Hosiery Company from Halifax, later becoming the Kayser Bondor ladies stocking factory (which temporarily produced parachutes during World War II).

drawn up before the parish boundaries were extended in the later 19th century, clearly shows the boundaries of the land grant made from the manor of Weston in the 12th century.

It is a triangular parcel of land beside the old Roman Road cut out from an older estate; it is likely that the Templars used their knowledge of mathematics when siting buildings.

In the case of Baldock, the bottom of the High Street had three such rows, until Butcher's Row was demolished by the Turnpike authorities in the 1770s.

In late 2008, a town centre enhancement plan included a narrowing of the road and subsequent widening of paved areas.

There has been human activity on the site well before the modern town was founded.

Prehistoric remains on Clothall Common date back as far as c 3000 BCE.

Throughout the early 20th century a large number of pubs continued to operate, many of which were sustained by the adjacent and much larger town of Letchworth, which had no alcohol retailers prior to 1958, and had only two pubs and a single hotel bar until the mid-1990s.

Its larger population had for many years visited both Baldock and Hitchin for refreshment.

The main theory of the origin of the name Baldock is as a derivation from the Old French name for Baghdad: Baldac or later Baudac, It is possible the Knights Templar used a name already in use, especially since the location was already a crossroads.

Other etymologies have been suggested, including Middle English "balled" meaning bald together with Old English "ac" meaning oak; and a conjectured Old English personal name "Bealdoc" meaning bold (with diminutive -oc suffix).

Thanks to its location, the town was a major staging post between London and the north: many old coaching inns still operate as pubs and hotels, and Baldock has a surprising number of pubs for its size.